Random NetBSD Images

(See also the current NetBSD in Action page)
Hardware & Software Displaying the World's Most Portable OS

 Machines
Display of the Japanese NetBSD User Group booth at the "Open Source Matsuri '99" with a number of machines and architectures represented, starting from left: NetBSD/sun3, NetBSD/i386, NetBSD/mac68k, NetBSD/pmax, NetBSD/macppc, NetBSD/sparc, and NetBSD/macppc on both a MacPowerbook G3 and an iMac (with some games on it :-).

jnug-booth2.jpgjnug-booth1.jpgjnug-booth3.jpg
 Desktops
KDE 3.0 ``Of course it runs (on) NetBSD!'' Naturally, this applies to the latest version of the K Desktop Environment, KDE 3.0, as well! Here you see a standard KDE3 desktop, showing the Konqueror web- and file-browser, the KDE Control Center (which lets you customize the look and feel of your environment) and the konsole, KDE's terminal.

On top of the konsole, you can find the BSD Daemon - a 'amor' variation, which provides helpful hints and tips as well as the proper "daemonic" feel.

Image contributed by Jan Schaumann <jschauma@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
NetBSD configured as state-of-the-art desktop system, running KDE. Using Konqueror as web browser in two windows, and showing KDE's file browser in a third windows. KDE standard features like preview of files in the file browser of antialiased fonts are of course available with NetBSD too. This display is on a notebook machine, which displays the battery properly (the machine is connected to the power outlet). And of course all activity is supervised by our beloved xdaemon (a xteddy scheme ;).

Image contributed by Hubert Feyrer <hubertf@NetBSD.org>

hubertf-kde2.png
 Desktops
tonio-gnome.png This one is GNOME 2.10 running on top of NetBSD 3.99.9. It shows the GIMP, gnome-terminal, firefox and nautilus (a file manager) in spacial mode, with image preview. It also features rhythmbox (a great music player), with a clean theme.

Image contributed by Antoine Reilles <tonio@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
Still not slick enough? How about running the windowmaker window manager with the FreeBSD Theme and a transparent wterm? Other applications shown here are xchat and the WindowMaker config utility.

Image contributed by Matthias Scheler <tron@NetBSD.org>

tron-wmaker.png
 Machines
sschumacher-xinerama.jpg The machine running this XFCE desktop has three video cards (Nvidia GeForce FX 5600 SE AGP, Matrox MGA G400 PCI and a 3Dfx Interactive Banshee PCI) each running at 1600x1200@75Hz with 24bit on one CRT. The cards are automatically detected and configured by xf86cfg, they are combined into one single 4800x1200 virtual desktop with option "xinerama" in /etc/X11/XF86Config.

Besides many applications, a listing of the machine's PCI cards showing the three graphics cards and the configuration relevant for Xinerama from /etc/X11/XF86Config can be seen on the right side of the desktop,

Images contributed by Stefan Schumacher <stefan at net-tex dot de>

 Apps
Got a laptop or notebook machine? NetBSD supports it, no matter if it's Intel, Sparc or a Mac! This KDE panel shows (from left to right) klavg displaying the machine's load average, kapm showing the machine's battery state (queried via APM), and the modem activity indicator that kppp (part of the kdenetwork3 package) brought to the panel to remain connected while still being mobile. And a clock. :)

Image contributed by Hubert Feyrer <hubertf@NetBSD.org>

kpanel-notebook.gif
 Machines
hpeyerl-jornada.jpg From notebook to subnotebook - NetBSD on a hpcarm based HP Jornada 720 PDA running NetBSD 1.5W with a NovatelWireless GPRS card. The machine was also tested with a Novatelwireless CDPD, Linksys WPC11 802.11, Lucent Orinoco Gold, and 3Com 10/100 Etherlink.

Image contributed by Herb Peyerl <hpeyerl@beer.org>

 Machines
NetBSD on a hpcarm based HP Jornada 720 PDA running NetBSD 1.6E, running mMosaic, Xdoom, and an xterm.

Image contributed by Herb Peyerl <hpeyerl@beer.org>

hpeyerl-jornada2.jpg
 Apps
rh-gnomewm.png This screenshot shows some production-grade office applications running under NetBSD. The desktop environment is GNOME along with the windowmaker window manager. In the top left section of the screen you can see the GIMP image manipulation program. The displayed picture has been scanned using the XSane scanner front end displayed below. In the top right section of the screen lies tgif, a technical drawing program. Below that, there is the desktop window of the StarOffice office suite, and on the bottom left section you can find the gnumeric spread sheet displaying a table and a print preview.

Image contributed by Rene Hexel <rh@NetBSD.org>

 Desktops
"This screenshot shows me running Firefox, Gaim, XFCE file manager and Gnome-Terminal. I am browsing the NetBSD website in Firefox while viewing my buddy list in Gaim. I'm doing this while simultaneously compiling giblib from pkgsrc (shown in my gnome-terminal). I installed all the applications running on my screenshot from pkgsrc."

Image contributed by Liam J. Foy <liamfoy@sepulcrum.org>

liamFoy-xfce.png
 Apps
klausner-fxtv1.jpgklausner-fxtv2.jpgklausner-fxtv3.jpg These three screenshots are of fxtv (TV program based on the bktr(4) driver) running in a windowmaker desktop, with wmcalclock in the upper left corner and gqmpeg with the shiny blue skin in the lower right corner. The motor cycle partially displayed in the back is a Honda Hornet.

Image contributed by Thomas Klausner <wiz@NetBSD.org>

 Machines
Some screenshots from HP Jornada 690 powered by NetBSD/hpcsh 3.99.8 running dillo, xchat, and builtin ssh under ratpoison and matchbox WMs.

Images contributed by Wojciech Rzymski <wrzymski at gmail dot com>

 Apps
WordPerfect This screenshot shows WordPerfect 8 for Linux running under the NetBSD Linux emulation. WordPerfect 8 is still freely available, have a look at this page for a list of download mirrors, and a link to the Corel Wordperfect for Linux registration site (where you can get a registration key).

Image contributed by Daniel de Kok <daniel@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
NetBSD is an excellent environment for running productivity applications. For example, this screenshot shows MoneyDance, a personal finance manager written in Java, running on NetBSD. It works with little effort using the included Linux Java runtime environment. The sun-jre14 package contains a short note with prerequisites that also apply to this runtime environment.

Image contributed by Daniel de Kok <daniel@NetBSD.org>

MoneyDance
 Apps
XML Editor The latest Java Runtime Environment 1.5 is available for NetBSD-current through binary emulation. This example shows the XML Editor XMLmind SE 2.8 (XXE2) running on NetBSD/i386 2.99.10 with the JRE 1.5 provided by the package lang/sun-jre15. XMLmind is a validating XML editor featuring a word processor-like view. On the screenshot you can see a completely localized environment for XML DocBook documentation processing. The same document is opened in the vi editor and in XXE2. The Mozilla browser displays the generated HTML document, containing draft guidelines for the translation of NetBSD documentation to the Russian language. The source document uses KOI8-R encoding and the HTML page uses UTF-8.

Image contributed by Mike M. Volokhov <mishka at NetBSD dot org>

 Apps
``What I like about NetBSD isn't what I'd call exciting, stuff like "no exciting crashes", "no exciting adventures trying to install software because its easy", "no exciting shopping for new computers every year" because my old machines are good with NetBSD.''

Image contributed by Dan McMahill <dmcmahill@NetBSD.org>

mcmahill-screen3.png
 Apps
klausner-oo.png This screenshot shows a text editor, a presentation editor, and a new presentation-wizard window of openoffice (office suite by Sun) running in a blackbox desktop.

Image contributed by Thomas Klausner <wiz@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
Thanks to Todd Vierling, NetBSD can now run CrossOver Office as well! This is a screenshot of a rather plain KDE3 desktop with OfficeSetup, Windows Media Player (idle), IE (viewing Windows Update, of all things 8-), and ClrMamePro (a retrocomputing file manager).

Image contributed by Todd Vierling <tv@pobox.com>

CrossOver Office
 Apps
CrossOver Office Using CrossOver Office on NetBSD it is also possible to run Microsoft applications, like Microsoft Word.

Image contributed by Daniel de Kok <daniel@NetBSD.org>

 Games
NetBSD can also be used for the occasional gaming. This screenshot shows Heretic II for Linux (ported by Loki Games) running under NetBSD 1.6.2.

Image contributed by Daniel de Kok <daniel@NetBSD.org>

Heretic II for Linux on NetBSD
 Games
hf-quake-screen2.gif Yes this is Quake, running on NetBSD/i386 using its capability to run Linux software.

Image contributed by Hubert Feyrer <hubertf@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
WaveLAN Image Sniffing is possible with NetBSD and driftnet. This image shows a notebook running NetBSD 1.6.2 with a Lucent WLAN card running driftnet to capture wireless traffic, analyze it and display any graphical content, from HTTP and other protocols. In addition, driftnet can also find mp3 audio streams and play them if wanted. General WaveLAN traffic statistics are displayed in the white-on-black window on the right side of the screen using slurm.

Image contributed by Hubert Feyrer <hubertf@NetBSD.org>

WLan Image Sniffing with NetBSD
 Games
awithers-bg.jpg Some of the most popular Windows games run flawlessly on NetBSD. Here is one such game, Baldurs Gate, running under the wine emulator. The amazing thing about it is that the game runs more smoothly and faster than under Windows itself!

Image contributed by Alex Withers <awithers@gonzaga.edu>

 Apps
In today's business world, applications from multiple environments need to coexist. Using NetBSD's wealth of networking facilities and advanced remote access capabilities, this works fine, as these images show.

The first one shows graphs from CA/Platinum DBVision running on the DEC UNIX machine with output displayed locally on a NetBSD/i386 machine. Below that to the left is an SAP R/3 GUI running on a different DEC box showing a database analysis screen, to the right of that is a vnc session running on NetBSD controlling a NT workstation. The second screenshot adds a CA/Platinum ServerVision realtime load average of another UNIX machine.

Images contributed by James Spath <James.Spath@bdk.com>

jamesSpath-drillbit1.png jamesSpath-drillbit2.png
 Apps
chrisSilva-cam1.png Digital cameras get increasing popular, and there are several applications available in the NetBSD Packages Collection that can be used to transfer the images from the camera to the computer, and post-process them. Like here with an Epson PC650 digi-cam with gphoto used to access the images stored on the camera.

Image contributed by Chris Silva <bitsurfer@makeworld.com>

 Apps
This screenshot shows NetBSD being used to access a Windows Terminal Server session running on a remote machine with Citrix's ICA client for Linux.

Image contributed by Andy Doran <ad@NetBSD.org>

ad-citrix.png
 Apps
MS Windows in VMware on a NetBSD 1.6 KDE desktop Sometimes you may have to run an application for a certain OS from Redmond. Fortunately, you can do that without shutting down NetBSD by running VMware Express on NetBSD/i386 in Linux-emulation mode.

Image contributed by Daniel de Kok <daniel@NetBSD.org>

 Apps
Here is a screenshot of Real Player 10 (available from pkgsrc) running on NetBSD/i386. It shows a video clip and some statistical information about the clip. It's also possible to play Real Videos embedded in webpages, Mozilla or Opera can be configured that way by using Real Player's plugin.

Image contributed by Rui Paulo <rpaulo@NetBSD.org>

rui_paulo_realplayer.png
 Machines
tron-nics.png Did you ever wonder how many network ports a notebook can have? This one has four: one onboard, one CardBus card and two USB 2.0 network adapters. It is running NetBSD-i386 3.0_BETA and serves as an experimental VPN gateway.

Image contributed by Matthias Scheler <tron@NetBSD.org>

 Machines
This image features a Xen showcase with an n-tier architecture that segregates the application server and the database server by placing them in different Xen domains. The figure shows a KDE screenshot from the Dom0 that displays the web application JPetstore (upper left), a VNC screen of this DomU and the tomcat application manager (upper right), the PostgreSQL database with the pgSQL console domain (lower right) and a terminal running xenconsole to monitor usage of the Xen virtual machines. brinkmoeller-xen.png
 Apps
wennmach-daemon-1.jpg This is "blue.geo.Uni-Koeln.DE", a Dell Inspiron 3800 laptop, running NetBSD-1.4.2. It runs KDE as desktop environment. xosview monitors the system activity and xworld shows me where the sun currently shines (modulo clouds). Development work on arla is going on in the two kvt windows.

The image was taken with a Kodak DC215 Zoom, and gphoto was used to download the image to blue.

Image contributed by Lex Wennmacher <wennmach@NetBSD.org>

 Games
NetBSD does QuakeWorld! You can now enjoy late night fragfests on your NetBSD/i386 machine with GLX based hardware acceleration (MGA or TNT) and sound! This game binary was compiled on NetBSD by porting the recently released Quake1 source code. You can also see a native QuakeWorld Server running in the bottom right xterm.

Image (gamma corrected) contributed by Andrew Gillham <gillham@whirlpool.com>

ag-quake-native.jpg
 Apps
davidMaxwell.png ``I like 800x600 16bit myself... Afterstep window manager (at work), NetBSD/i386. Too many windows to really show off, so this is fluff. Netscape communicator, Xnotes+, gqmpeg mp3 player and the lighthouse.gif background from way back when. GIMP 's running, but out of the way. (So are various other things on other desktops) Various important web pages are displayed prominently...''

Image contributed by David Maxwell <david@maxwell.net>

 Machines
Thanks to AMD and Wasabi Systems, NetBSD is one of the first Open Source Operating Systems running on AMD's upcoming x86-64 architecture. So far no hardware is available, but Virtutech's VirtuHammer x86-64 simulator is used for emulating it - see the upper left corner of this screenshot!

Image contributed by Frank van der Linden <fvdl@wasabisystems.com>

fvdl-x86_64.gif
 Desktops
hpeyerl-blab02.jpg This is a picture of the current NetBSD build lab project, trying to accumulate one machine of each platform NetBSD currently runs on. The goal is to provide access for evaluation purpose and porting software to NetBSD. From left to right and top to bottom there is: arm32 shark, Alpha Multia, 2*HP425t, 2*Power Bar, Sun 3/80, 2*disk chassis for NFS server., PPro/200 NFS server, pc532, PPro/200, mvme167, Mac monitor, Next68k, DS5000/133, VaxServer 3100, Sun 4/690, Sun 3/60, AnnexII console server (the latter two both inside 4/690 chassis), Mac Q700.

Image contributed by Herb Peyerl <hpeyerl@NetBSD.org>, please contact him also for access to any of the lab's machines.

(A similar pile of hardware can be found on Todd P. Whitesel's "NetBSD Architecture Farm" page.)

 Desktops
Technical documentation? Easy thing for a Commodore Amiga running NetBSD/amiga with lyx-xforms as the text processor of choice (lyx-qt is also available). This desktop also features an afterstep dock and some icons.

Image contributed by Ignatios Souvatzis <is@NetBSD.org>

ignatios-desktop.lyx.gif
 Apps
is2.png Need to do fancy presentations? A Laptop with NetBSD/i386, or a DNARD running NetBSD/arm32, will connect to your conferences' projection system. Using magicpoint will allow for colored or animated presentations, and even call life operating system commands showing their text or their graphical output.

Image contributed by <is@NetBSD.org>

 Desktops
Wanna experience latest the Internet technologies? NetBSD offers a tightly integrated IPv6/IPsec environment for you! The screenshot presents IPv6 ifconfig(8), IPv6-ready tcpdump(8) sniffing IPv6 ssh traffic, and additionally Japanese webpage from Japan NetBSD users group.

Image contributed by Jun-ichiro itojun Hagino <itojun@itojun.org>

itojun-v6-japanese.png
 Desktops
jmmv-gnome.jpg A busy GNOME 1.4 desktop running on top of NetBSD/i386 1.5ZC. You can see Galeon (the web browser), The Gimp, a Gnome-MC window (file manager) and, at last, Staroffice 5.2 running through Linux emulation. The Favorites opened menu shows a list of other interesting programs, like GnuCash, XCDRoast, FXTV, Emacs, etc.

Image contributed by Julio Merino <jmmv@hispabsd.org>

 Machines
Have you ever seen a quad-CPU Mac tower, running NetBSD on each CPU of this multiprocessor box? Here's your chance to see one! ;-)

Looking to inside - system is running PVM/POV-Ray and doing a task of 3D scenes render in parallel.

Image contributed by Mike Hogsett <hogsett@csl.sri.com>

maciici-stack.jpg
 Apps
mcmahill-screen1.png Dan wrote in on this: ``This is me working on my thesis proposal. On the right is a figure being drawn using tgif. At the bottom right is the output of a simulation which I plotted using the GNU plotutils 'graph' program. To the left is part of a scilab plot window and an emacs window. The upper left is a preview of part of my proposal.''

Image contributed by Dan McMahill <dmcmahill@NetBSD.org>

 Desktops
This screenshot of a Sparc IPX running NetBSD/sparc with fvwm95 for a window manager shows ongoing work on a web page. XSane is being used as a frontend for a scanner, feeding its output directly to GIMP for further graphic design/editing. Netscape communicator is running via NetBSD's SunOS binary compatibility, the page is being served by the same machine running the apache web server.

Image contributed by Dan McMahill <dmcmahill@NetBSD.org>, the cake can be ordered from his wife. :-)

mcmahill-screen2.png
 Machines
melKravitz-i-opener52.jpg If you happen to be the proud owner of a Netpliance I-Opener, the machine not only qualifies as a Internet terminal, but can also do services like acting as a file server applying NFS and Samba.

Image contributed by Mel Kravitz <melk@switchpwr.com>

 Machines
In many houses, you will find The Computer set upon a golden pedestal: it gets a special ``computer table'' all to itself, as if a generic flat surface were just not good enough. There is a gigantic screen, wires and papers and CD sleeves everywhere. It is revered, and it is feared. With NetBSD, you have access to an environment that is not so fussy as to demand this absurd level of attention. Instead of cleaning up messes and dousing fires in all your free time, you can actually begin to get something done, and if it's just using the machine with a serial console as a bedside terminal.

Image contributed by Miles Nordin <carton@Ivy.NET>

milesNordin.jpg
 Games
pooka-rt2.png Here's another one from the games department, running the Linux version of Railroad Tycoon 2 on NetBSD/i386.

Image contributed by Antti Kantee <pooka@iki.fi>

 Apps
You can see on the cube:
  • A reclining figure. Art and aesthetics.
  • Some typeset mathematics. Math, graphics, typesetting, documentation. (TeX, teTeX, ghostscript, GIMP)
  • A starmap. This is from the SETI@Home project, the purple lace shows that part of the sky that has been examined by the project (Dec. 1999).
The above images were independently scaled to power-of-2 dimensions (e.g., 512x1024) in order to make OpenGL (Mesa) happy. Then a program (see the emacs window with source code, upper right?) read the files and had Mesa render the images as textures on the facets. Program controls let me put the eye & lights where I thought they had the best effect. (The program was one that I wrote this fall, and readily adapted to the purpose at hand. )

Image contributed by Richard Rauch <rkr@rkr.kcnet.com>.

richardRauch.png
 Machines
stevew-mvme68k.jpg Here you see a 12 slot VME rack containing four Motorola single board computers (two MVME147's, and two MVME167's) running NetBSD/mvme68k. A closeup of the VME rack shows the four CPUs and two other cards installed. From left to right:

  • A 33MHz m68040 MVME167 with 32Mb main memory, running NetBSD-1.4.2.
  • An 8Mb VMEbus memory board.
  • A 25MHz m68030 MVME147 with 8Mb main memory, running NetBSD-current.
  • Identical to the previous machine, running NetBSD-1.4.2.
  • A 33MHz m68040 MVME167 with 16Mb main memory, running NetBSD-current.
  • A Radstone SIO-4 16-port serial card.
  • Two SCSI disks (one 4Gb Quantum, one 1Gb Seagate) for the first machine.
Images contributed by Steve Woodford <scw@NetBSD.org>. See his homepage for more pictures!
 Desktops
One of the vital components in operating systems today is proper driver support, derived from vendor-provided device documentation and brought into shape for the system's driver framework. As an example this screenshot shows Adobe Acrobat Reader (available in the acroread package, running in Linux emulation) displaying the DECchip 21143 programmer's manual, some xterms and a vi in which the `tlp' driver is being worked on. The machine this is on is a Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop running NetBSD/i386.

Image contributed by Jason Thorpe <thorpej@NetBSD.org>

thorpej-desktop1.gif
 Desktops
twm-desktop.gif Different machine, different window manager, same OS: twm on a SparcStation 10 running NetBSD/sparc 1.4.1, with some C++ source being worked on, gdb, gnuplot for checking a different program, and an xdvi (part of the teTeX package) in the background with a paper the desktop's owner's working on.

Image contributed by Ethan Bakshy <ethan@enteract.com>

 Systems
This screenshot displays NetBSD/i386 running under emulation using VirtualPC on a PowerMac. WindowMaker was used as the WindowManager on the NetBSD side, on the grounds that anything that takes five hours to compile is clearly a demonstration of a healthy system.

Image contributed by Peter Seebach <seebs@plethora.net>

vpcbsd.png
 Desktops
sergio.png NetBSD-1.6A desktop installation, with gnome-1.4 on a PIII 600MHz. On this screenshot you can see xchat (with transparency), galeon, sylpheed-claws, xmms, gimp and ccmsn.

Image contributed by Sergio Jimenez Romero <TripleDES@eSlack.org>

 Desktops
This Athlon 1900 XP machine running NetBSD 1.6ZE is used as a personal workstation for web development and image manipulation (GIMP), playing music (xmms) and watching movies (DivX player). XFce 4, a more lightweight desktop environment than KDE or GNOME provide, is used here.

Screenshot contributed by Argo Laanemets <netbsd@purk.ee>.

xfce4 desktop


Back to NetBSD gallery
(Contact us) $NetBSD: screenshots.html,v 1.35 2011/07/07 11:53:21 spz Exp $
Copyright © 1994-2003 The NetBSD Foundation, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
NetBSD® is a registered trademark of The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.